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TRUTH V POWER


US LAWS REWARD
WHISTLEBLOWERS GLOBALLY

Wherever you are we can help you present your case in the US. 
Protect. Empower. Reward.
 

HAVE A CASE ?

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TRUTH V POWER


US LAWS REWARD
WHISTLEBLOWERS GLOBALLY

Wherever you are we can help you present your case in the US. 
Protect. Empower. Reward.
 

HAVE A CASE ?

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CONTACT US


Since the 19th century, the US government has rewarded whistleblowers
for exposing fraud. No other country has a similar system. Now, in
the 21st century, people from all over the world can receive
rewards in the US if they provide unique, non-public,
and specific information identifying fraud
against the US government, or fraud or
bribery by a company listed on a US
stock exchange.

LEARN MORE

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

CONTACT US


Since the 19th century, the US government has rewarded whistleblowers
for exposing fraud. No other country has a similar system. Now, in
the 21st century, people from all over the world can receive
rewards in the US if they provide unique, non-public,
and specific information identifying fraud
against the US government, or fraud or
bribery by a company listed on a US
stock exchange.

LEARN MORE

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

REWARDING WHISTLEBLOWING WORKS


REWARDING WHISTLEBLOWING WORKS


The US implemented global whistleblower rewards because they are the most efficient means to protect transparent markets. These laws are meant to encourage individuals to stand up for their values. The Cheryl Eckard case against GlaxoSmithKline in New York and the Per Yvsen Monsen case against Siemens in Oslo provide two powerful examples with important differences.

 

GlaxoSmithKline Case
Cheryl Eckard, a Global Quality Assurance Manager at GlaxoSmithKline, felt like she was alone. Drugs were being adulterated, and she was worried it would lead to patient harm. She told Senior Vice Presidents, wrote a report to seven executives, yetthe drugs were still adulterated, the plant was still dysfunctional, and in May 2003 she was terminated. Then she reported to the FDA and consulted Getnick & Getnick. The firm presented her case to the Department of Justice and in 2004 filed a lawsuit on behalf of the US government for fraud.  In October 2010, GlaxoSmithKline settled civil and criminal charges with the government for $750 million. Ms. Eckard was awarded $96 million of the federal portion of the recovery by the Department of Justice which, together with additional awards from the states, resulted in the largest reward for a single whistleblower in US history.

 

Siemens Case

In 2003, Siemens was systematically over billing on its contract with the Norwegian Department of Defense. Per Yngve Monsen, chief-controller at Siemens Business Services in Norway, realized that $6 million on the bills did not match any of the services provided. Mr. Monsen alerted his superiors but nothing was done. He sent the documents to Siemens' headquarters anonymously. A few months later, Mr. Monsen was summoned to a meeting with management and the confidential report was presented in front of him. They informed him there was a mole from Oslo who would be exposed and dismissed. Before long, he was fired. 

 

In 2005, Siemens was ordered to pay Mr. Monsen approximately $240,000 for wrongful termination equivalent to 6 months of his salary. Siemens was also ordered to pay a $1.6 million fine to the government and $19.5 million back to the Norwegian Army.

 

Whistleblower laws similar to those in the United States could have helped Mr. Monsen. Laws written to empower, protect and reward whistleblowers create protections for whistleblowers against the same actions Mr. Monsen faced. International individuals and companies can take advantage of these laws and in conjunction with our attorneys take on companies to fight fraud globally.